What The Supreme Court Prayer Ruling Means For Schools

Educational law expert Dr. Jim Castagnera will distill the critical points of the Kennedy decision. You will learn how to adjust school policies and practices to comply with this case law.

What You'll Learn

  • What does the Kennedy decision say? What does it mean?
  • May school districts restrict staff and student speech?
  • When is a staff member speaking as a private citizen or public employee?
  • What makes religious speech special?
  • What implications does the ruling have on holidays and other school practices?
  • Where is the Supreme Court headed from here?
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Training Overview

Are employees allowed to pray in school? Learn what this Supreme Court ruling means for you.

The Supreme Court blessed prayers on the 50-yard line in its June 27 ruling in Kennedy v. Bremberton School District. A Washington-state school district suspended Football Coach Joe Kennedy after he prayed on the field after every game. Kennedy sued the district, arguing infringement of his First Amendment rights.

Justice Neil Gorsuch spoke for himself and his conservative colleagues:

“Here, a government entity sought to punish an individual for engaging in a brief, quiet, personal religious observance doubly protected by the Free Exercise and Free Speech Clauses of the First Amendment.  And the only meaningful justification the government offered for its reprisal rested on a mistaken view that it had a duty to ferret out and suppress religious observances even as it allows comparable secular speech. The Constitution neither mandates nor tolerates that kind of discrimination.”

Understand what these words mean for you and your school district before the new school year begins. Learn answers to these questions and more during our upcoming webinar:

  • What does the Kennedy decision say? What does it mean?
  • May school districts restrict staff and student speech?
  • When is a staff member speaking as a private citizen or public employee?
  • What makes religious speech special?
  • What implications does the ruling have on holidays and other school practices?
  • Where is the Supreme Court headed from here?
Recommended Audience
Who Should Attend?
  • Superintendents
  • District administrators
  • Faculty union representatives
  • Charter school board members
  • Principals and assistant principals
  • Special education directors
  • Diversity and equity officers
  • Department chairs
  • Program directors
  • Curriculum specialists
  • Education nonprofit groups
  • Community engagement professionals
  • School leaders
  • Teachers and teaching assistants
  • Paraprofessionals
  • Student services directors
  • School curriculum directors
  • Social workers
  • Counselors
  • Behavior specialists
  • Compliance officers
  • Title IX coordinators
  • Athletic directors
What's included
Training includes
  • Certificate of Attendance
  • All resources and training materials
About

Expert Presenter

Jim Castagnera
  • Member and the Chief Consultant of Holland Media Services LLC, a communications and training company with offices in Philadelphia and Los Angeles
  • Member of Portum Group International LLC, a cybersecurity and privacy consulting firm in Philadelphia
  • Of Counsel to Washington International Business Counsel
  • Adjunct Professor of Law in the Kline School of Law at Drexel University
  • 10 years as a labor, employment, and intellectual-property attorney with Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr
  • 23 years as associate provost and legal counsel for academic affairs at Rider University
  • Holds an M.A. in Journalism from Kent State University
  • J.D. and Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University